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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
THURSDAY, NOV. 15, 2012

CONTACT:

James Burnette Jr., director
NCDA&CS Structural Pest Control and Pesticides Division
919-733-3556

N.C. Pesticide Board announces November case settlements

RALEIGH — The N.C. Pesticide Board recently approved the following settlement agreements for respondents in Bladen, Buncombe, Currituck, Gaston, Northampton, Pitt and Robeson counties, Demopolis, Ala.; Philadelphia; Greer, S.C.; Garland, Texas.; and Sturtevant, Wis.

  • Murdock M. Butler III of Tar Heel agreed to pay $600 for applying restricted-use pesticides without being a licensed applicator.

  • Cape Fear Chemicals Inc. in Elizabethtown agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated Tiger Brand Fruit Tree Spray in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated because it had inconsistent amounts of captan.

  • Jose Tarcicio Serrano of Candler agreed to pay $600 for allowing a non-certified applicator to obtain restricted-use pesticides using Serrano’s license.

  • Robert G. Warren of Candler agreed to pay $1,100 for purchasing and applying restricted-use pesticides without being a certified applicator.

  • Johnny F. Akins of Knotts Island agreed to pay $200 for applying Asana XL in a manner inconsistent with its labeling. The insecticide was applied to grapevines on Akins’ property and is not labeled for use on grapes.

  • Charles Eric Jones, president of Mount Holly Farm Supply Company in Mount Holly, agreed to pay $1,000 for purchasing restricted-use pesticide Trooper 22K without being a licensed pesticide dealer.

  • Larry M. Lee, a street foreman for the Town of Gaston, agreed to pay $1,100 for applying pesticides without a public-operator license. Neither Lee nor anyone associated with the Town of Gaston was licensed as a public operator at the time the application was made.

  • Charles I. James of Robersonville agreed to pay $1,100 for applying Acumen Herbicide, Ignite Herbicide, Reflex Herbicide and Belt SC Insecticide in a manner inconsistent with the pesticides’ labeling, which violated worker protection rules. James failed to provide specific information about the applications, required pesticide safety training and personal protective equipment for his workers. He also failed to record specific information about when each application was completed.

  • Image Supply Inc. in Lumberton agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated Plus Two Germicidal Cleaner in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated because it was contaminated with gram-positive bacilli.

  • Larry H. McGougan, president of St. Pauls Farmers Exchange in St. Pauls, agreed to pay $1,800 for selling restricted-use pesticide to a non-certified applicator and for failing to keep required records of the sale of restricted-use pesticides.
  • Kenneth Hyde, an employee for Personal Touch Inc. in Demopolis, Ala., agreed to pay $1,500 for applying several pesticides in a manner inconsistent with the labeling to a right of way adjacent to Cape Fear Community College North Campus in Castle Hayne. The pesticides damaged vegetation on the campus, and the labels state they should not be applied under conditions favoring drift.

  • National Chemical Laboratories Inc. in Philadelphia agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated Lemon Quat in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated because it was contaminated with gram-negative bacilli.

  • Jeff W. Frix, an employee of BWI Companies Inc. in Greer, S.C., agreed to pay $500 for selling restricted-use pesticide Trooper 22K to Mount Holly Farm Supply Company in Mount Holly. At the time of the sale, Mount Holly Farm Supply Company was not a licensed pesticide dealer.

  • Carroll Company in Garland, Texas, agreed to pay $900 for selling adulterated Cello Safe-T-Bowl Plus in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated because it was contaminated with gram-positive bacilli.

  • The Butcher Company in Sturtevant, Wis., agreed to pay $900 for selling adulterated Blue Skies II Disinfectant Cleaner in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated because it was ineffective against P. aeruginosa.

  • Diversey Inc. in Sturtevant, Wis., agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated Triad III Disinfectant Cleaner in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated because it was ineffective against P. aeruginosa.

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NCDA&CS Public Affairs Division, Brian Long, Director
Mailing Address:1001 Mail Service Center, Raleigh NC 27699-1001
Physical Address: 2 West Edenton Street, Raleigh NC 27601
Phone: (919) 707-3001; FAX: (919) 733-5047

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